EVO 2020 online tournament results should be on par with the offline tournament results of the past

Current tournaments taking place over the internet are finishing with the same people you know and expect, for the most part

Posted by Jonathan 'Catalyst' Grey • May 4, 2020 at 11:11 a.m. PDT | Comments: 32

If you're expecting the results for EVO 2020 online to be radically different than what we've been seeing in the fighting game community through the years, think again.

For those of you who haven't been paying attention, a number of tournaments have already moved online, for the time being, due to the novel coronavirus.

Events like The Quarantine Series have had over 5,000 people sign up to compete, and the results of Cosmos, Dabuz and 8BitMan finishing high mirror those of other major offline events. This is with Super Smash Bros. Ultimate's notoriously bad online netcode, where a campaign is currently underway to get it fixed.

For fans of Street Fighter 5, over 50 people signed up for Next Level Battle Circuit online 6 and the top 3 for that consisted of two Capcom Cup champions in NuckleDu and iDom, along with the very strong END|Shine.

This is not to say that online tournaments will be devoid of problems, but even offline tournaments have had their fair share of technical issues, like complaints of lag or inconsistent match formats being ran for Ultimate Marvel vs. Capcom 3 at EVO 2013.

Moving some aspects of FGC tournaments online is going to present some challenges, but also opportunities. Over 5,000 people signed up for recently ran Quarantine Series Pound Online, which rivals the record breaking 5,000+ Street Fighter 5 entrants EVO 2016 hosted.

While it's hard to envision a day where online tournaments fully supersede offline competitions, the results show that the competitions can still be valid, if not ideal.

Technical problems will happen, and how and when the organizers respond to these concerns, along with how things are setup initially will be huge in making these events as valid as possible.

Technical problems will happen, and how and when the organizers respond to these concerns, along with how things are setup initially will be huge in making these events as valid as possible.

If things are done correctly though, we'll see some doors opened for new players who do not have the ability to travel to events to showcase their skills. Some players train heavily online or in their locals, and are extremely good, but don't have the chance to showcase this, and you need look no further than VS|Arslan Ash or EVO 2011's winner, RZR|Fuudo, who was a known name in Japan, but hadn't hit the mainstream FGC's radar until his victory with Fei Long at that event.

Online tournaments are going to present some new and unique challenges, and certainly not every competitor is going to be a fan of of events hosted in this format. That said, they'll also open some new doors for the FGC in bringing more people into our competitions and we'll get to see some new players and characters who rarely get to see the spotlight.

Battle by the Bay 3 took place in 1996 and had about 40 competitors attend. Getting a bunch of fighting game players in one place to show who was the best sounded like a ridiculous idea back then to many people, but that event would evolve into EVO, which is the biggest eSports competition in the FGC now.

Online tournaments might seem like a laughable idea to many currently, but if done with the proper execution and forethought, we might look back and laugh at the days where we thought online tournaments weren't a reasonable place to showcase our skills.

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