'We should be critical of developers for not implementing correct netplay into games' - Maximilian on fighting game netcode and how to make it better

Posted by John 'Velociraptor' Guerrero • September 3, 2019 at 11:11 a.m. PDT

Gaming's continued transition into the online arena has become more and more accelerated in recent times, and it's now to the point that general netcode standards have widely surpassed the experiences most fighting game developers are producing.

It would seem as though this would be one of the most conspicuous and rapidly-dealt-with issues, and yet the majority of even our genre's most favored titles still offer laughably poor online experiences. Maximilian recently went on a stream rant as to why this is the case.

The central issue comes from a concept known as the "Not invented here" (NIH) syndrome. The NIH stance is essentially the idea that established entities are often unwilling to adopt or utilize practices or technology from other entities for a variety of possible reasons.

As Max points out, NIH syndrome affects many different groups across general humanity but has been noted as a common problem in Japanese businesses. It's not that the technology and approaches aren't already out there, but many developers are often hesitant to use and build off of ideas and tech that is not their own.

This will naturally lead to instances of reinventing wheels instead of making forward progress. This isn't to say that progress hasn't been made, as Max points out a few examples of fighting game developers branching out and broadening horizons, (the wide adopting of Unreal Engine is a clear instance) but it usually takes something like major financial failure to something like this to take place.

Give Max's video a watch and let us know what you think of his two cents in the comments below. How long before fighting game developers really jump on board with making top-notch netcode a priority?

Load comments (61)